Tag Archives: American

Winter’s bone

7 Apr

It’s often difficult for me to write about new films I see at the cinema. So engrossed in the story, I don’t focus so much on little details and close analysis. My emotions are almost impossible to put into words and I linger over certain images on the train ride home. This is especially true with Winter’s Bone which I finally watched the other evening but I’ll give it a try.

The second feature from Debra Granik based on the book by Daniel Woodrell, it’s an intense and sombre piece set in Missouri among the white trash community. 17 year old Ree cares for her mentally disturbed mother and younger brother and sister. Times are hard and food is scarce but they manage to survive thanks to her strength of mind and a little outside help. Yet when the local sheriff pulls up to announce that both the house and woodland have been put up by her father for bail and that they will lose their home should he not turn up for his impending court case, Ree has no choice but to go out looking for him. Bleak but never depressing, it’s a film that gets under your skin like the cold wind, gradually becoming more powerful until a scene so terrible that it stays with you for days afterwards. I felt the pain of losing the places you grew up in, of needing at least one stable thing to carry on and the fear of being engulfed by the darkness outside.

This isn’t a film for everyone but it really touched me in a way few others ┬ácan.